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  • Article: Feb 1, 2019

    We send out a lot of emails.

    One of the groups of people we email are Lib Dem campaigners. They receive resources for local literature, templates and bulk buy deals, local and online campaigns training and support for holding local events.

    As there are a lot of people who no longer open these emails who receive them, we are refreshing the email list.

  • Article: Feb 1, 2019

    We have come a long way in recent years.

    I was the originator and architect of the same-sex marriage act

    I was the originator and architect of the same-sex marriage act, which legalised same-sex marriage in the UK on the 5th February 2013, when I was the minister for equalities in the Home Office. I came in at the end of the story when countless activists had been fighting to for this change - I just happened to be in the right place at the right time to take the bill to parliament. But it took the courageous Liberal Democrat politicians to make this change against big lobbying interests.

  • Article: Feb 1, 2019
    By Greg Foster

    There was just the one council by-election last night (plus one to the non-partisan City of London Corporation). Charles Lister stood for the Lib Dems in Warlingham ward, Surrey County Council and secured a solid result - closing the gap between us and the Conservatives from 27% to less than 10:

  • Article: Jan 31, 2019

    MPs passed an amendment last night that required Theresa May to go back to the EU and try to renegotiate the backstop.

    The EU didn't mess around - the vote result came out at 8:41pm, and by 8:47pm they'd said the backstop was there to stay. Here's 11 things that Theresa May could have done to pass the time:

  • Article: Jan 30, 2019

    Brexit latest

    In Parliament last night there were lots of heads shaking in bemusement. The Commons gave the government diametrically contradictory instructions to the Prime Minister: no to 'no deal'; then yes to a proposal that will in all likelihood lead to 'no deal'. As we milled around central lobby afterwards, queuing to speak to the TV cameras, I saw MPs claiming victory for two opposite positions. Someone is going to be disappointed.

  • Article: Jan 30, 2019

    The title of this article should be common sense, shouldn't it?

    And yet, between 2014 and 2016 alone, over 3000 people were dragged before the court. Not for doing anything wrong, but for falling foul of a 195-year-old law.

    The 1824 Vagrancy Act was drafted with soldiers coming home from the Napoleonic Wars in mind. It's a cold, archaic relic from a bygone age. I will do everything in my power to ensure it doesn't reach its 200th birthday.

  • Article: Jan 30, 2019

    Last night, MPs passed an amendment to the Prime Minister's motion - the Brady amendment. It actioned Theresa May to go back to the EU and ask them to take the Northern Ireland backstop out of the deal.

    It took the EU six minutes to say no.

    There's only one compromise Theresa May should accept - a people's vote

  • Article: Jan 29, 2019

    Last night, MPs finally got a chance to vote on bringing Parliament into the 21st century by introducing a year-long proxy voting trial. I've been working hard for this change along with MPs from all parties for a long time. This is a welcome - if long overdue - victory.

    Our conventional pairing system is painfully outdated and vulnerable to abuse. Brandon Lewis broke one such arrangement with me on a crucial Brexit bill last year - in fact, he specifically broke the pair only for the two closest and most important votes that day. Worse, afterwards, it emerged that this was deliberate - the Conservative Chief Whip had also asked other MPs to break their pairs (though they had honourably declined to do so).

The Liberal Democrats are the only party fighting to keep Britain open, tolerant and united.

Open means open-hearted, open-minded, forward-looking, modern, green, internationalist and pro-European. We believe Britain is at its best when it is creative, innovative and outward-looking, comfortable in the fast-changing modern world and open to the opportunities and challenges of globalisation and the digital revolution.

Tolerant means diverse, compassionate and generous. We will always fight injustice and stand up for the underdog, the outsider, the individual, the minority and the vulnerable against the powerful.

United means we will always put the interests of the whole United Kingdom first. We reject the divisions in society, whether between young and old, urban and rural, leave and remain, or between regions and nations. We believe we are stronger - as communities, as a country and as a world - when we work together in our common interest.

If this sounds like you too, join us.